Mugshot of Killeen teenager accused of Austin mass shooting released

Local News

UPDATE: The Travis County District Attorney announced on June 22, 2021 that charges against Jeremiah Tabb were dropped.

Original report:

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Austin Police released a picture of the Killeen teenager accused of taking part in the deadly mass shooting that ended in one person dead and 13 others injured in downtown Austin’s Sixth Street over the weekend.

Jeremiah Roshaun Leland James Tabb, 17, was arrested on a suspicion of aggravated assault, according to a release from the Austin Police Department.

Tabb was arrested Monday without incident in Killeen while enrolled in a summer school class, police say. Killeen ISD police say the suspect was arrested at Harker Heights High School.

At age 17, Tabb is legally considered an adult under Texas law and his case will be handled in the adult criminal court system.

On Saturday afternoon, APD confirmed the arrest of another young person in connection with the deadly shooting. This person is under the age of 17.

State law dictates that juvenile court records for anyone under the age of 17 are not public information.

“The reason for this is to avoid criminalizing juvenile misconduct and to promote rehabilitation of the child,” a spokesperson for the Juvenile Probation Department.

The Travis County Juvenile Public Defender, Kameron Johnson, told KXAN he couldn’t speak directly about this case, but he explained that generally juvenile cases happen at an accelerated pace.

There is no bail system for juveniles under Texas Family Code, but the juvenile court is required to hold a hearing every 10 working days to decide whether a child in custody is to be released or will continue being detained.

There are also limited reasons a child can be held in police custody in the first place, including their likelihood to abscond, the lack of a suitable parent or guardian able to help them return to court, and the level of danger they pose to themselves or the public.

Ultimately, the District Attorney can decide to try children as young as 14 years old as adults, depending on the level of charges they face and the severity of the case details.

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